Josiah and Lincoln, the Great Reformers: A Tribute to the Worth and Work of Our Martyr-President, Delivered in the Reformed Dutch Church, Easton, Pa;, on Fast Day, June 1, 1865 by Cornelius H Edgar

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Author
Cornelius H Edgar
Publisher
Forgotten Books
Date of release
Pages
20
ISBN
9781330888735
Binding
Paperback
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PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
5
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Josiah and Lincoln, the Great Reformers: A Tribute to the Worth and Work of Our Martyr-President, Delivered in the Reformed Dutch Church, Easton, Pa;, on Fast Day, June 1, 1865

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Excerpt from Josiah and Lincoln, the Great Reformers: A Tribute to the Worth and Work of Our Martyr-President, Delivered in the Reformed Dutch Church, Easton, Pa;, On Fast Day, June 1, 1865

Easton, Pa., June 2, 1865.

Rev. C. H. Edgar, D. D.:

Reverend and dear sir:

Your able, touching and eloquent discourse upon the National Fast Day, was listened to with deep interest and great satisfaction by those present.

The undersigned, believing that its circulation would do good, respectfully ask the favor of having the manuscript for publication.

This sermon is given to the press in response to the foregoing note.

And all Judah and Jerusalem mourned for Josiah. - 2 Chronicles xxxv.24.

The mourning for Josiah was so spontaneous, so sincere, and so general, that, for a long time after, it was spoken of as unprecedented and never equalled. From that time until now - nearly three and twenty centuries, no ruler was ever so lamented as the simple-hearted, honest, young and sturdy Josiah, - the God-fearing, patriotic, great reformer. His character and work have in our day found a parallel, and the mourning of which our text speaks has been surpassed. We do not assert that a greater and a better role has lately passed away from among us - caught up like Elijah in a chariot of fire, but we dare say the grief is as sincere, and the mourning far more widely extended. Not intimating the least detraction from the merits of the reformation by the good King Josiah, we honestly believe that larger numbers will be benefitted, and more marked and permanent results for good will take date with the administration of the equally good and not less great President Lincoln.

"And Jeremiah lamented for Josiah: and all the singing-men and all the singing-women spake of Josiah in their lamentations." This tribute to worth and this expression of mourning for a good man and a great ruler has been repeated and multiplied in our national funeral which has continued for forty-eight days and is this day consummated by religious services throughout the land. The priests and the choirs in our Israel have taken up the weeping prophet's lamentation, and with bowed heads have exclaimed and on plaintive harps have sung, The breath of our nostrils, the anointed of the Lord was taken away in their pits, of whom we said, under his shadow we shall live.

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